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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not.
anything. (sirens) >> it's disgraceful what is going on in public education in philadelphia. in most large urban cities, 50% of the kids are dropping out. almost every large urban district is dysfunctional. philadelphia is at the highest level of dysfunction. there was a need to engage students. the normal curriculum is boring, and kids are disinterested. today what we are going to do, the first thing is we are going to move the gt over here. all right? ready-- one, two, three. so, the evx team is an afterschool program. we build and design hybrid and electric vehicles. we had success the very first year. the students won the local science fair which was a first for... for students from west philadelphia high school. from there, it just organically grew. >> here, put it over here. the mission of the evx team this year is to be serious competitors in the automotive x prize. the automotive x prize is a $10 million competition that's invited teams from around the world to develop viable vehicles that get over 100 miles per gallon. we're the only high school in the world that has thrown our ha
to be assigned, but he also wanted to exposes them to a european education into the world of international affairs in the world of diplomacy. and they went to sea with benjamin franklin and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside paris at the time and john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. within several, he was speaking french folly. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15 he could speak four languages fought late, had rd studied latin and greek. he was so gifted in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really vent
started out as an easiest, then became a collector and then became an educator to her website called raglan in.com and ultimately through this book. the story how i first discovered historic newspapers have been about five years ago. at least when i took her first family vacation to illinois, a cozy mississippi river town, were on the main strip every discovered they were bookshop and in that rare book shop i found this nondescript container full of old newspapers, picked one up and started reading it and it april 21st 1865 near times. i was reading abraham lincoln assess the nation every word for the capture of his conspirators. that moment triggered in me an intense passion and enthusiasm for history that i previously had never had. so for the next five years, it became this journey of meticulous collecting a newspapers because i'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient access to a lot of the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access to a lot of the originals found in the libraries and institutions across the country. so i made it a point to collect the
1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applause] [applause] >> the thank you ladies and gentlemen for that extraordinarily gracious ,-com,-com ma warm welcome. thank you to the national archives and to the staff for making this event possible and thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thank you justice thomas for being with us today as we marked the 225th earth day, 225th anniversary of our constitution. i guess i would like to start our conversation with the words of the constitution, we the people, and what that phrase means to you and how that phrase baby has changed over time thanks to amendments a
prevention. we also believe parents need to be educating their kids and talking to kids about appropriate sexual behaviors to assure all of the young people in philadelphia are prepared when they think about having sex for the first time. we believe that our role is to assure that as partners for parents, we provide what young people may need if they're going to act responsibly in terms of sexual relations. >> you talk about education and i just want to throw out numbers. 25% of new hiv infections in philadelphia alone are teenagers. 15% of philadelphia students say they weren't taught about hiv or aids in school. some might argue maybe more education might be the answer, not condoms. >> we don't think it's one or the other. we think most are important. we're including education not only in schools but also include the internet and we're providing condoms as we've been doing now for more than a year in a number of locations throughout the city for young people. >> let's talk a little bit about the program. tell me a little bit about how it will work, because the part that i sort of took t
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has grown. these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for it. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and you have to do battle with th
more off the free stuff. another thing that i would do would change the education system to where in your senior year and you decide whether you will go on to college or be a blue-collar worker. if you are going to be a blue- collar worker, you go into apprenticeships for the last year of high school plan that particular field, because now these high school people get out of high school and they don't know how to change a light bulb and they end up not having a skill and they don't have the money to go to school for whatever reason and they don't learn a skill. so they end up on the welfare system. if you took that last year of high school and taught them a skill, then they would have a skill and able to earn money and not go on welfare. host: let's leave it there, jim. on facebook -- brad in victorville, california. good morning. are you with us? last chance. we will move on to doreen in connecticut. caller: i'm a small business owner. host: what kind of business? caller: i do alterations. in the evening return our business into a zumba class for ladies. my daughter and i seem to
time. >> it's a pleasure. >>> armed and educating? parents and teachers question the nra's plan for armed police officers in every school. >>> plus, deal brewing? starbucks pushing congress to reach a deal on the fiscal cliff. wait until you hear about what they're doing to send encouraging notes to our elected leaders. are you optimistic that congress will meet a post-christmas fiscal cliff deal? [ male announcer ] this is sheldon, whose long dy setting up the news starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> so as newtown, connecticut, recovers from the tragic shooting, police are across new england stepped in to give officers at the town's police department a day off to spend time with their families and that christmas is one of the millions the
wrinkled. >> that is educational. >> zarf, quickly. >> it's this. >>> all right. jonathan is an 11-year-old drummer, enjoys exploring the p p percussive sounds of household appliances. check this out. okay. so he's 10 years old when he posted the video in september. he's taken drum lessons but says he's basically self-taught. he thinks the washing machine is easier to play than his own drum kit. sounds like a college marching band. he's really good. >> you want to demo? who's really good at percussion? you play the guitar. >> i've done enough in this segment to embarrass myself. i think we should do phil collins "in the air tonight" drum solo. >> while they do that, i'm going to tell you that up next we've got five ways to actually keep your new year's resolution in 2013 right after this. this family used capital one venture miles to come home for the holidays. that's double miles you can actually use... sadly, their brother's white christmas just got "blacked out." [ brother ] but it's the family party! really jingles your bells, doesn't it? my gift to you! the capital one venture card
were on our site. the idea was the state cannot make an educational opportunity available for one sex only. in any event, that left justice scalia as the lone dissenter in the vmi case. now, the case about the family medical leave act and the chiefs understanding that it was important not to make this a maternity leave, that it should be part of the workers life when you have a sick child, a sick spouse, a sick parent, you can take time off for that putting did the job in jeopardy. well, i'd like to say that i had something to do with it. i don't think that's too. i think a case that came before the court influenced him. but most of all, i think he was influenced by his granddaughte granddaughters. one of his daughters was divorced and she had two girls, and the old chief cut took responsibility for being a male parent figure for those girls. they loved him, and i think he, he thought about how he would like the world to be for them. >> when you think about this evolution, starting really didn't read versus reed in 1971, which was a case involving an idaho probate law that said males
they have college educations many of them. they certainly have high school educations, and they need to be able to have some kind of legal status that allows them at least to work until they can decide if they want to do something -- go back to their home country or stay here and work in a legal way, so i think there are ways that we can take a little bit at a time. i think border security is high on everyone's agenda, as is some kind of guest worker program. so i think that it is a priority. i have been in on many of the discussions, and it's a hard issue, but it's one that has to be addressed. we got several hard issues right now, luke. >> i'm sure you'll be playing a role on the outside when your senate term expires on immigration. senator kay bailey hutchison, thank you so much for joining us, we appreciate it. >> thank you, luke. >>> mark your calendars, south carolina is the place to be in 2014. get those reservations. three marquee races in a state that's known for nasty politicking. we can't wait. your palmetto preview is next. this is "andrea mitchell reports" only on msnbc.
the best interests of the american people first. >> plus, keeping our kids safe, is arming educators the symptom or adding to the problem. >>> and can anyone beat sko brown? >>> good day. we're live in washington this afternoon. the lines of communication between the president, leaders of congress are open. whether those lines are used repeatedly over the next few days to reach a fiscal cliff deal is anybody's guess. joining me now for our daily fix, nbc's kelly o'donnell is live on capitol hill. kelly, i want to start with you. senator scott brown just tweeted out to all his followers that he was getting on a plane heading to washington. the president has apparently sent over a new deal to the senate. what can you tell us about this new fiscal cliff deal that president obama has sent over to senator leaders? >> well, the power of social media to get the word out. gop sources say in the conversation with the president, he indicated that he does have a bill he would like to bring forward to the hill today. they have not seen that. it would be a package to deal with averting the fiscal
products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get th
educating them. with that said, i'm concerned about investors in general not really understanding what they have, and if interest rates go up, even a small amount, there could be negative rates of returns on securities or funds and how will they react, particularly in an environment where there's a potential for less liquidity. dagen: washington, as they have in the past, pardon the language, screws things up, though, then the fed a likely to stay accommodative; right? in the coming year, do you think? >> they absolutely are. i think it's probably, at least near term, the right policy. my concern is if inflation unexpectedly rises for some reason, will they be quick enough to pull away all the enormous liquidity in the market place? they feel they can, but we have seen instances before in the past 20-30 # years where that's not been the case, and it's going to be pretty hard to figure out so, to me, that's one of the bigger, longer term issues not to come into play, at least through much of 2013. dagen: bob, really quickly, what do you like owning right now? what helps you sleep? what
as history. just educational to americans. >> well, it's fascinating, isn't it? it's like an epic inside baseball movie because it doesn't take the piece of lincoln's life that we're most familiar with. instead, the civil war is almost done. and here is a man who is weighing how to translate this horrible, horrible war and the emancipation proclamation, freeing the slaves and how to turn it into policy, government policy, to say that all things are equal under the law. so you watch this movie and it makes you think lincoln wasn't just some guy who sat on a pedestal. he was a guy out there playing hardball. he had these three lobbyists in the film. i wish we could take -- >> no, they were on the fiscal cliff. >> the fiscal cliff guys and it says -- >> no, they're the best lobbyists i've seen. it showed that the democratic party of that day were pretty were copperheads. they were playing ball with the war ending saying that they could let the south keep slavery. >> right. and you know everything didn't really change until the so-called southern strategy. i had to keep doing back flips in m
a right to an education. >> i will get my education if it is in home, school or anyplace. >> the taliban retaliated, hunting her down, shooting her in the neck and back. the attack outraged even hardened pakistanis and all around the world, malala quickly became a symbol of good against evil. today she's recovering in england. number one. president obama. >> tonight you voted for action, not politics as usual. >> after a long and we mean long and bitter campaign, president obama won re-election. in 2012, the president also won the supreme court stamp of approval for his health care reform program and made history with this statement. >> i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. ♪ >> as 2012 comes to a
for educators, this at the same time two firefighters were shot and killed by a man with an assault rifle similar to the one used in newtown. the mayor of philadelphia responded this way. >> i guess mr. lapierre would then say that firefighters need to have armed guards go with them. i mean i think it just shows that that was a completely dumb ass idea from the start. >> president obama has called for a meaningful conversation on guns, but it seems as if americans are talking at not to each other. talk back question today, will america ever come together on guns? facebook.com/carolcnn or tweet me @carolcnn. i'll be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide h
in philadelphia are teenagers. not getting the education for one reason or another and they say this will help. parents, of course, some of them see it differently. >> i will keep my mouth shut. wait until the interview, hear what the guy has to say. >>> the power of the media helped get a stolen pooch back to its family. just finishing up the paperwork to adopt the chihuahua mix on saturday when someone stole him on saturday. the alarm sounded on social media over the weekend and by monday, got a tip that broke the case. >> folks in oregon care deeply about pets, and the social media pressure was outstanding, so i think when they realized they had a hot puppy, so to speak, they were eager to return him to the shelter. >> he was in my arms when i first met him, and he is there again now, so it's good. >> so what happened? we don't really know. the pup doesn't seem to care much. no arrests so far. >> it looks just like your chihuahua, drew. >> it sure does. >> on the plane last night. >>> walk if yrning if you are traveling. there could be heavy snow to the north and severe weather to the south
the country, parents understandably are scared. educators are concerned about security in schools. let's go to utah where the teachers will be getting weapons training today. and arizona's attorney general plans to have trained or principal trained with a gun inside the school. basically they're not saying they want the teachers to go roaming the halls with a gun. but this is like the last standr classroom. >> clayton: the first response are how are they going to allow guns in utah. in utah, one of the few states that allows guns in public schools, the legislature there had that state's rights, that's how they've done it for years. what the school says to your point, we don't want them roaming the halls, but it's free. we're going to waive a $50 fee on training so if you want to learn how to hold a gun, concealed weapons holder, get more training. the argument from gun advocates is they're much more able to quickly respond should some mad man come into a school than police having a swat team get there five, six, seven minutes later. >> kelly: the same thing holds true for arizona. i know wh
in 2 1/2 years. and barnes & noble chairs rallying over british publishing and education company pearson says it will invest $85.9 million in nook media in exchange for a 5% equity stake. >>> well, houston's port is a big employer and a very busy one, one of the busiest in the world, but it could be stalled by a labor strike that threatens the city, as well as more than a dozen others along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast. annise parker is the mayor of houston. mayor parker, great to have you with us. >> glad to be with you. >> your port handles about 70% of the shipping container business along the gulf coast, so this could be a major blow how will it impact your city, exactly? >> of our nine terminals, two are container terminals, and it will shut those down. 70 to 150 workers will be not showing up to work, will shut down access to those terminals now. we will continue to do business through our other terminals, but it could have a really severe and immediate impact on not just what happens at the port, but this is about cargo moving to other places. so it's everything up
work with others around the country who have a lot more education than me and we work with cornell food physiologist who's helping quantify the nutrient density of our vegetables. we start with the ground up. a lot more complex, a lot more vitamins in the ground. we take care of the plants like they're children. we nurture them we study them as they're growing and it's anazing the results. >> and a lot of work. >> a lot of work. >> briefly who would you have this fabulous dinner with? >> my wife. my wife. >> you should have her here. >> i don't see her enough during that holiday season. >> you can toast her. happy new year's to your wife to micoh. happy new year's and thanks so much. for david bouley and the dish head to our website cbsnews.com/cbsthismorning. >> don't go away. we'll be right back. you're watching "cbs this morning saturday." "this is george. he is a good little monkey and always very curious. one day george got an important letter. he's built a rocket ship to travel into space." google, how far is earth to the moon? the moon is 238,900 miles... "
's education. that group peaked in 2000 in terms of americans, fell since then, turns in 2013, starts to grow and it will be bigger than the baby boom is over the next decade. >> the good times are coming, tobias? >> we think so. >> the baby boomers taking their money out. >> consumer finance, happy you brought that up, almost like you logged it in for me. survey financials shows people post-65 take their equities down. the good news is the baby boom average age is 55. so we've got ten years to worry about that. >> we do our work. >> tobias, good to see you. happy holidays. >> happy holidays to you. your little hockey player? >> the day before christmas, of course, still no fiscal cliff resolution. the $500 billion in spending cuts and tax increases start on january 1st unless the white house and congress reach some sort of agreement. we're joined by former pennsylvania governor ed rendell, co-chair of the campaign to fix the debt. and a cnbc contributor. governor, happy holidays. good morning to you. >> good morning, guys. >> so we're sitting here wondering what can be done in the next seven
hearing the screaming and shooting over the school's loud speakers. it also says the board of education failed to provide a safe school setting or emergency response plan. in all, 26 people, including 20 children were shot and killed by gunman adam lanza that day. russia playing politics. putting their kids at risk. their orphans at risk. president vladimir putin has banned americans from adopting russian children. the move reportedly is in response to human rights violations handed down by president obama earlier this year -- earlier this month rather. putin's new law destroying the dreams of many american families currently in the process of adopting, including this. >> they were already our family. we already had their names. we were already decorating their room. it's really. [crying] >> are you crying? it? >> is so disturbing, this story. 1,000 russian children were adopted by americans last year. children are disabled. not wanted by anybody else in russia. living in orphanages. not available for adoption. a the love these families have gotten really close to the adoption. set ever
people. some of them who have formal education, some who did not. they cared about the country. i think you need to have that today. i think that, you know, i go back to your book, you talk about the written and unwritten constitution. the unwritten constitution is that sort of trying to bring to apply it to current events and problems and cases, and developments and the debate continues on each one of those. and that's why you see the court go different ways. that's why the arguments -- [inaudible] that's why the scholarship is so important. one thing i like about the tone of the book. it's so positive. it's refreshing. you know, it's not i have all the answers. here is some answers. let's talk about it. it isn't up here. i told my clerks, when we work on opinions, you have to explain -- take your parents, they rim gaunteds, they are -- immigrants they are bright people. i don't think they are doctors or lawyers. it's their constitution too. and we should explain it and get in a they interpreted in a way to make it s&l to them. -- assessable to them. that's what i think you're trying t
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)